Re: Running Volume

#24663
yiddles
Guest

Hi all,
Here is the detailed protocol. I couldn’t upload the pdf because the file size was too big. I’ll email steve and see if he can upload it for me, along with the spreadsheet for calculating the distances based on MAS scores. If anyone decides to have a bash at this test then I will send on the audio file separately.
Cheers

MAXIMAL AEROBIC SPEED (MAS) TEST AND RESULTING AEROBIC
INTERVAL TRAINING

THE MAXIMAL AEROBIC SPEED (MAS) TEST

The maximal aerobic speed (MAS) test is designed to assess the minimum speed that elicits VO2max. This is commonly referred to as vVO2 max, or the velocity associated with VO2max. The utility of this test is that it provides a pace that can be used to set training intensities. In this example the MAS test will employ the mode of running.
Ideally an oval track should be marked out that is 200 or 400 metres in circumference. For the purpose of explanation a 200 metre track will be used. Place a single coloured cone (e.g., red) at 25 metre intervals around the marked track (see Figure 1). For the 200 metre oval track this would constitute 8 cones of the same colour . Take 8 different coloured cones (e.g., yellow) and place each 2 to 3 metres behind the red cones on the
marked track (Figure 1). Set up the portable CD player and adjust the volume to a high
level. Explain the procedures to the athletes and ask if the explanation is clear prior to commencing the test.

PROCEDURE:
Have athletes perform a warm-up and light stretch. The warm-up may constitute jogging around the 200 metre oval two to four times.
Have each athlete stand next to a red cone to ensure that the athlete farthest from the CD player can hear the beep sounds.
The test begins with the athletes running at 10 km/hr around the marked track and requires them to be within the different coloured cones (2 to 3 metre distance) at the sound of each beep. In effect, this means that at each beep the athletes need to have covered a distance of 25 metres.
The speed remains constant for a period of two minutes, after which it increases by 1 km/hr every two minutes. The increase in speed will be accompanied by a verbal announcement of the new speed. When the verbal speed announcement is heard (e.g., 10 km/hr) the tester should place a cross through the number 1 of the zone numbers on the record sheet (see Figure 2). Testers should place a cross through consecutive zone numbers as the athlete successfully passes each 25 metre mark (i.e., at each beep sound on the CD). The test continues with the athlete running until one of two termination criteria is achieved. Either the athlete voluntarily withdraws due to fatigue, or they fail to make the 25 metre distance three consecutive times. This means that if the athlete does not reach the required 25 metre distance once or twice consecutively they still have the opportunity make up the lost ground by the third set of cones. When the athletes fails to
reach the required 25 metre intervals on three consecutive occasions, the last successful zone marked with a cross is taken as the completion score.
This will result in a speed and accompanying zone being recorded for each athlete. The test is sensitive to 0•5 km/hr and the final speed is determined as follows:
Count the number of zones in that speed level the athlete has been able to complete. If
half or more of the zones in that level have been marked with a cross then the athlete is awarded an extra 0•5 km/hr increment to that final speed level achieved. For example, if the athlete finishes on the level associated with 16 km/hr and they successfully complete zone 17 then their final MAS score is 16•5 km/hr. If another athlete reaches speed level 15 km/hr and the last successfully completed zone is 9, their final score remains at 15 km/hr. If, however, this same athlete successfully completed zone 10 then their final
score would be 15•5 km/hr.

Speed Level Zone
(km/hr)
10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
15 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
16 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
17 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
18 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
19 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
21 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
Figure 2. Record sheet for MAS test.

AEROBIC INTERVAL TRAINING DESIGN BASED ON RESULTS FROM THE
MAXIMAL AEROBIC SPEED (MAS) TEST

Using the results of the MAS test and the time and running distance sheets provided in the accompanying Excel spreadsheet, determine the distance that each athlete must run in 15 seconds if the intensity is set at 120% of MAS.

Figure 3: An example of 15 second running distances at 120% MAS based on selected 100% MAS speed test results.
Although Figure 3 shows cones for each runner at the starting and finishing points of each running interval, in reality all athletes commence at the same point and run for different distances depending on their level of aerobic fitness as measured by the MAS test.
Set out the distance of the cones based on the MAS test results.
Have all athletes assemble along a line that will be designated as the starting line. On the “go” command called by a tester the athletes commence running toward the cone that designates their set run distance.

The tester jogs behind the athletes and counts down the final 5 seconds of the 15 second run interval at a volume that all runners can hear.
Athletes are required to be passing their designated cone at the 15 second mark. The athletes now rest passively (slow walking is okay) for 15 seconds and then at the “go” command of the tester commence running back to the original start line in 15 seconds.
This 15 second on 15 second off work:rest ratio continues until a total of sixteen 15 second runs have been completed. Note that this is a 1:1 work:rest ratio and hence suitable for training the aerobic system.
*If heart rate meters are being worn, note down the resting heart rate before commencing the runs and at the end of every 4 interval runs.
Note down the RPE at the end of each 4 interval runs. Ask how the athlete feels at the end of the 16 repeats of 15 second running.
* This information is not usually required to complete the interval training but can be included if it is of interest to the S&C coach.

REFERENCES
Dupont, G., Akakpo, K., & Berthoin, S. (2004). The effect of in-season, high-intensity
interval training in soccer players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,
18(3), 584-589.

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