• This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #23219
    lloydy
    Guest

    I’m relatively new to the explosive lifting scene, but keen to really give it a go. The 1 area I struggle on is the “catching” position of a clean, the bar tends to finish in more a military press starting position rather than elbows/forearms pointing horizontally, this is with all weights.

    I’m thinking this is a flexibility issue, if it is any ideas how to work on this?

    Lloyd.

    #24045
    bris83
    Guest

    Try having a bar racked up with a lot of weight (90-100kgs) then just unrack the bar in the front squat position without actually doing a front squat and just stand there. Try and keep increasing the range of your elbows. Also if you train with a partner they can stand behind you and gradually push your elbows through a bit more. Hold this position for roughly 30s-60s.

    Let me know how you get on.

    Tom.

    #24050
    fergus
    Guest

    I would stretch lats also.

    (Some people with very big biceps have trouble catching and front squatting also!!!)

    #24046
    lloydy
    Guest

    I’ll take the big biceps being my problem then. 😀 Thanks for the info, I’ll incorporate both in the coming weeks and let you know how I go.

    #24051
    fergus
    Guest

    Well I’ve only ever seen one guy who had that problem!

    If you can get a physio or someone they could stretch it quicker for you or release any tightness quickly, or do like you were adivsed above … do a good lat stretch … should help.

    #24040
    ashley
    Guest

    I agree with Fergus, tightness in a few key areas may be your major issues, also I am lucky I have small biceps, keeping the chest up is a priority as if you lose that posture your elbows will start to drop and then you will lose the heavy ones, I had a player once who was having problems keeping his chest up, we used a safety squat bar and did some upper back crunches for higher reps to see if that had an effect, in a standing position, maybe worth a try as well, light weights to start and keep the rest of the body tight and solid, cheers, ashley

    #24052
    fergus
    Guest

    I was just going to say that too … the height and lean where/when you catch could be important

    #24041
    ashley
    Guest

    @bris83 119 wrote:

    Try having a bar racked up with a lot of weight (90-100kgs) then just unrack the bar in the front squat position without actually doing a front squat and just stand there. Try and keep increasing the range of your elbows. Also if you train with a partner they can stand behind you and gradually push your elbows through a bit more. Hold this position for roughly 30s-60s.

    Let me know how you get on.

    Tom.

    Nice Tom, great idea I would also add mayb be doing some partial range heavy front squats out of the power rack with the pins set up arount 1/4 or 1/8 depth and start from the bar resting on these pins, set you yourself up in a good solid starting positiion elbows up and slightly turned towards each other and then keep the chest high and drive through the heels to the standing position, lower slowly and re-set, a set of 5 is actually 5 singles with only a short rest between each, cheers, ashley

    #24049
    richard
    Guest

    One trick is to ensure you have a bar that freely rotates and therefore you can relax your grip on the bar as you catch. The bar should rest nicely on the front of the shoulders and on the fingers in a free open position.

    #24054
    jmc404
    Guest

    A good idea is to imagine doing breathing pullovers except do them standing if that makes sense to extend your range of motion?? Keeping the elbows high.
    JMC

    #24053
    kosterzoo
    Guest

    Just to add my 2c

    I think there are a few reasons people fail to get there elbows under the bar

    1. is that they’re using their arms to rotate the bar.
    2. The weight is too light so they’re not really having to ‘catch it’
    3. The bar is not moving in a straight line close to the body

    I remember when i was learning i’d use an empty bar to warm up with and just
    Think of the bar as only being allowed to travel in a straight line and it was my job to get underneath it, i’d forcefully drive my elbows up hard once i got under the bar, this really paid dividends and while by no means am i a great oly lifter i’ve never had problems with my elbows since

    #24055
    onspeed
    Guest

    Quite a few of our athletes have similar problems when they start – usually due to tight wrists / elbows / large upper arm

    we do a lot of stretching in these areas to help and we also use auxillary training with straps over the bar and front squats in the clean position- instead of holding the bar in the clean position – you hold the straps in the same – and let the weight gradually increase your flexibility – the straps will allow you an inch or two of extra freedom to start – you can work on perfecting the rest of your position and have a gradual stretch into a good clean

    I would estimate that 90% of athletes can get this clean position mastered with time

    #24042
    ashley
    Guest

    Good points, I once heard a coach say to a group at a presentation that between 99 and 100% of all people will have sore wrists when they start, so it is just a factor of going through and learning, if not then the clean pull still gives you what you need through the hip, knee and ankle extension, so that other 10% will not miss out

    #24048
    dan135
    Guest

    @lloydy 118 wrote:

    I’m relatively new to the explosive lifting scene, but keen to really give it a go. The 1 area I struggle on is the “catching” position of a clean, the bar tends to finish in more a military press starting position rather than elbows/forearms pointing horizontally, this is with all weights.

    I’m thinking this is a flexibility issue, if it is any ideas how to work on this?

    Lloyd.

    Hi lloydy,

    A few of the guys I train with used to have the same problem. My o-lifting coach taught us the following stretch for my lats and tri’s:

    http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=GbC8q-6ddMo

    We would do it side on like in the video keeping your hand between your shoulder blades and then rotate in so you’re facing the wall at an angle and press your ribs and armpit towards the wall. That with stretching the triceps and forearm flexors generally fixed the problem.

    He would also cue us on using the muscles in our thoracic to keep our elbows up and not our delts.

    Cheers,

    Dan

    #24043
    ashley
    Guest

    Pressing snatch balance for thoracic flexibility is a wonderful movement
    can also be done in split leg position many of my players have difficulty
    at the same phase as you have stated due to lack of flexibility, injury
    and the such, it is a constant coaching point, elbows up, chest high, a
    good front squat will be of assistance to you as well by positioning the
    elbows where you need them for the bar to sit up behind the anterior
    delt, also as my weightlifting coach, Luke Borreginne once said to me, “
    whatever you can front squat for 3 you will never have a problem with
    standing up with a clean” so it is a confidence thing as well, cheers,
    ashley

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.