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  • #23299
    sean_a
    Guest

    As had been mentioned elsewhere you are in favour of conjunctive training I would like to know how you get the correct mix of endurance/hypertrophy/strength/power ratios into your sessions and why you are infavour of this as opposed to maybe not traditional periodisation but one tinkered with to try and ensure players/athletes reach appropriate level at required time.

    #24443
    ashley
    Guest

    In rugby we have to be at our best with an extensive range of bio motor qualities to be firing at the same time, it is not a pure sport such as hammer throw or 400m hurdles, it is a mixed metabolic sport, it is a mixed strength quality sport, it is a mixed speed sport, scceleration components, agility and top end speed so in order that all these qualities are developing I train them more or less concurrently. We monitor players subjectively each week in season but most of our workis done off and pre season adn we are just tinkering each week to ensure players are fresh to play on game day, as to how I get the correct mix it is the balance of art and experience, knowing your athletes and being with them and them responding when you ask one to pull back and the other to go harder, trust and respect built up over a number of years are as essential as knowledge of science, cheers, ash

    #24446
    sean_a
    Guest

    Thanks Ashley there are some it will work for others not just as you suggested.

    #24447
    onspeed
    Guest

    As always the stuff Ash does with rugby is also on the pulse for other sports.

    Most athletes once past their period of foundtion training will work by the basics of a broad conjoint principle. So in any week sessions will focus on most of the needed attributes – speed, power, strength, some added muscle mass, appropriate aerobic levels etc. Some sprinters go so far as to incoude at least a small aspect of speed work in every session. Over the top of this broader concept specialisation relative to an individual athlete’s needs is then possible – they can work harder on lagging components or drop out some now and then if they are well developed and they need more recovery time.

    The other rationale behind conjoint training is detraining – although most athletes can maintain good strength levels across a reasonably extended period of detraining speed at least in top end performing athletes falls off very quickly – as westside rightly says – if you aint training it you are losing it

    even across extended periods of offloading – top british sprint cyclsits for exampe can offload from weights for up to 14 weeks before peak competitions- many of these elements are still addressed conjointly ut at a far lower volume – again using the exampl of sprint cyclists – they may do brief power work but on their bike and then brief speed work – across the same day.

    #24444
    ashley
    Guest

    Thanks onspeed, the inseason plan works very well with a conjugative form of training as we are always prioritising from 3 perspectives, that is the secific player, what the coach sees and what I see as s & c coach, so within this triumverate of ideas we come up with a weekly plan to work on areas that need the most work but never neglect strengths as well, it is what makes h ejob so interesting, cheers, ash

    #24445
    fergus
    Guest

    Strength training is a means (stimulus) to an end not an end itself so if the stimulus is being provided else where there is no need to double the work.

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